February, 11-12th
Venue: The Royal Society

FAPESP Week London

Organizer
Institutional Support
 

About

In 2019, from February 11 to 13, the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) will organize FAPESP WEEK LONDON. The symposium aims at strengthening the links between researchers from Brazil and the United Kingdom with the objective of promoting research partnerships.

FAPESP is one of the major funding agencies for scientific research in Brazil. Funded by the public taxpayer, its mission is to foster scientific research in all fields of knowledge by awarding scholarships, fellowships and grants to investigators linked with higher education and research institutions in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

FAPESP is aware that the very best research can only be done by working with the best researchers internationally. Therefore, it has established partnerships with funding agencies, higher education, private companies, and research organizations in other countries known by the quality of their research and has been encouraging scientists funded by its grants to further develop their international collaboration.

As part of these efforts, FAPESP has organized symposiums and exhibitions in several countries, in cities and states as Washington, D.C., Cambridge, North Carolina, California, Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, New York and Texas (US), Barcelona, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Toronto, Salamanca, Madrid, Tokyo, London, Beijing, Munich and Brussels.

The State of São Paulo has a population of 45 million and generates 32% of Brazil’s GDP. Under the State Constitution 1% of all state taxes are appropriated to fund FAPESP, which was put in motion in 1962.

The stability of the funding and the autonomy of the foundation allow for an efficient management of the resources that has had a sizable impact: while São Paulo has 16% of the Brazilian population and over 30% of the scientists with a doctorate in the country, the state responds for close to half of the country’s scientific articles published in international journals.

The effectiveness of research carried out in São Paulo is the combined result of several factors that include the quality of the state’s universities and institutes, the extraordinary productivity of its researchers, high rates of participation by private, São Paulo-based companies that function within the state’s R&D outlays, São Paulo’s outstanding infrastructure, and the existence of FAPESP, a well-designed state research-sponsoring agency governed, maintained by its directors with excellence and with autonomy over the past half century.

Within this context, in 2017 FAPESP applied $ PPP 523.0 million in scholarships and grants.

In accordance with the Foundation’s funding objectives, 38% of expenditure was earmarked for advancing knowledge, 5% was dedicated to supporting research infrastructure and 57% was allocated to supporting application-driven research.

FAPESP works in close contact with the scientific community: all proposals are peer reviewed with the help of panels composed of active researchers from the specific area. Many times scientists in São Paulo submit proposals for programs to the foundation which are carefully analyzed and, if deemed strong in academic terms, are shaped by the foundation into research programs that will constitute a set of related research projects in a given area.

Since FAPESP’s mandate is to foster research and scientific and technological development in the state, ideas for programs that couple world class research with contributions that will impact social problems are welcome.


Main Topics

  • Astrophysics
  • Biological Sciences and Drug Discovery
  • Dimensions of Research Collaboration in a Changing World
  • Health and Ageing
  • Industry-University Research Collaboration
  • Inequality, Social Inclusion, and Migration
  • New Energies
  • Scientific Communication in the 21st Century
  • Water-Food-Energy Nexus

Program

February 11th

  • 08:30 a.m.
    registration
    Registration
  • 09:00 a.m.
    hello
    Opening Cerimony

    Opening Cerimony

    Andrew Allen, Director of International Affairs, Royal Society
    Marco Antonio Zago, President, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)
    Embassy of Brazil in London
  • 09:30 a.m.
    hello
    Official Presentations

    Official Presentations

    Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Andrew Allen, Director of International Affairs, Royal Society
    UKRI Presentation
  • 10:45 a.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • 11:00 a.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 1: Health and AgeingChair: TBC
  • Ricardo Araya

    Ricardo Araya

    King's College London
    Tackling the Emerging Challenge of Ill-Health Among the Elderly in Brazil
  • Alícia Kowaltovski

    Alícia Kowaltovski

    University of São Paulo (USP)
    Calorie restriction and aging: the mitochondrial connection

    In humans, obesity is associated with increased incidence of a variety of age-related diseases. Similarly, laboratory rodent lifespans are limited by obesity, including that promoted by ad libitum access to standard chow diets. Indeed, a daily limitation of caloric intake (calorie restriction) has been widely shown to enhance lifespans and prevent age-related diseases in rodents. We will discuss the metabolic effects of caloric restriction, and show that mitochondrial form and function are regulated by caloric restriction. We will also demonstrate that changes in energy metabolism promoted by this dietary intervention prevent age-related diseases and modifications in different tissues. Overall, our results show that caloric intake, mitochondrial form and mitochondrial function are intimately interconnected, presenting central regulatory roles in age-related diseases.


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  • Mayana Zatz

    Mayana Zatz

    University of São Paulo (USP)
  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 12:30 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
  • 02:00 p.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 2: Biological Sciences and Drug DiscoveryChair: BBSRC
  • Patrick Varga-Weisz

    Patrick Varga-Weisz

    University of Essex, Colchester and Babraham Institute, Cambridge
    Chromatin dynamics and host-microbe interactions in the intestinal epithelium

    The gut, especially the colon, is a complex ecosystem where a myriad of microorganisms interact with the host epithelium and aid in the digestion of food stuff and training of the immune system. However, this interaction can go wrong, leading to infections or inflammatory bowel diseases. In fact, accumulating evidence indicates that the gut-microbiome has wide ranging effects on health and disease. We study how changes in the packaging of the genome in the epithelial cells, chromatin, are involved in the crosstalk between gut bacteria and the host. In collaboration with the group of Prof Marco Vinolo, University of Campinas, Brazil, we have identified a novel histone modification, histone crotonylation, that appears to be involved in this interaction (Fellows et al., Nature Communications 2018). I will talk about unpublished work that shows how nucleosome remodelling factors are involved in this crosstalk, too.


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  • Ana Marisa Chudzinski-Tavassi

    Ana Marisa Chudzinski-Tavassi

    Butantan Institute
    Animal venoms as tools for the discovery of new molecular targets: Strategies developed by CENTD

    The CENTD is a research center focused on the discovery of molecular targets and signaling pathways, implemented at the Butantan Institute, in São Paulo, Brazil, as a result of a typical triple helix collaborative partnership between FAPESP, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Butantan Institute. In it, first-class science is being conducted employing the most modern molecular and cellular biology techniques, including phenotypic multi-parametric assays, interatomic, proteomic, transcriptomic analysis and bioinformatics. The CENTD aims to identify and validate new molecular targets related to immuno-inflammatory and degenerative diseases, like osteoarthritis and cancer, using venoms, toxins and peptides from the Brazilian biodiversity and from other countries. A Biobank was created for the maintenance and management of the venom collection. Pro and anti-inflammatory cell models, tumor cell cultures and tumor translational models were established with the aim of finding active molecules, targets and signaling pathways to allow for the development of innovative medicines. After identification of a potential new target, subsequent validation utilizes molecular biology methodologies like the CRISPR/Cas9 system for gene knockout and expression activation, knockout animals and in vitro and in vivo tests. To date, 19 whole venoms and 28 peptides have been screened for pro and anti-inflammatory effects in 6 cellular models that have been established and standardized, including osteoclasts, chondrocytes, synoviocytes, THP-1 monocyte/macrophage, adipocytes and neurons-like cells. Isolated fractions with potential anti-inflammatory and/or cytoprotective properties have been selected for further validation. In addition, cytoprotective peptides were tested in cell cultures from 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in disease and to find new molecular targets for OA treatment. Concerning cancer models, in addition to studies on tumor cell cultures, we performed transcriptomic studies on spontaneous melanoma tumors occurring in horses in the Butantan Institute`s Farm. Selected tumors were treated with Amblyomin-X, a recombinant Kunitz-type inhibitor derived from a cDNA library from the Amblyomma sculptun tick salivary glands. Amblyomin-X was previously described as a proteasome inhibitor inducing selective cell death in several tumor cells. This molecule promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and activation of caspases in several tumor cell types. Results derived from the transcriptomic analysis of the horse tumor translational model indicate that this molecule triggers immunogenic cell death (ICD) by triggering key molecular pathways. As a general conclusion, the collaborative partnership established in the CENTD could be an effective model for the development of high impact SCIENCE in concert with novel drug discovery.

    Financial support: FAPESP/GSK/IBu


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  • Steve Hill

    Steve Hill

    British Heart Foundation
    New approaches to study ligand binding to GPCRs and RTKs in living cells

    Short Bio

    Is Professor of Molecular Pharmacology in the School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham. He is also Co-Director of the new University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham Centre of Membrane Proteins and Receptors (COMPARE] and President of the British Pharmacological Society. Steve obtained his first degree in pharmacology at the University of Bristol and his PhD (pharmacology) at the University of Cambridge. His research has concentrated mainly on the molecular pharmacology of cell surface receptors (particularly G protein-coupled receptors [GPCRs] but more recently receptor tyrosine kinases) and their influence on intracellular signalling cascades. Currently, the emphasis of his work is on the study of ligand-receptor interactions in membrane microdomains of single living cells using a variety of fluorescent imaging techniques including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, confocal imaging, TIRF microscopy and resonance energy transfer techniques. In particular, he is interested in the cooperative interactions (positive and negative) between the protomers of receptor dimers, the influence of small molecule allosteric regulators on orthosteric ligand binding and signalling and the potential for protein-protein interactions between receptors and associated signalling proteins to convey signalling bias. He joined the University of Nottingham in 1981 and was subsequently promoted to Reader (1989) and Professor of Molecular Pharmacology (1995). In 1997, he became Director of the Institute of Cell Signalling and in 2008 Head of the School of Biomedical Sciences (until 2013). He was a founding director of the University of Nottingham spin-out company CellAura Technologies Ltd that provided fluorescent ligands to the scientific community until it was acquired by HelloBio in 2014.

    His work is currently funded by BBSRC, MRC (adenosine A3-receptors; new fluorescent ligands for PY2 receptors; development of Orexin agonists) and the EU ITN ONCORNET. Steve currently also holds a Raine Foundation visiting Research Professorship at the University of Western Australia, where he is also Adjunct Professor. He was recently awarded the 2018 Vice Chancellor’s Medal from the University of Nottingham.

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  • Glaucius Oliva

    Glaucius Oliva

    University of São Paulo (USP)
  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 03:30 p.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • 04:00 p.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 03: AstrophysicsChair: Cardiff University
  • Oliver Buchmueller

    Oliver Buchmueller

    Imperial College
  • Carlos Guillermo Giménez de Castro

    Carlos Guillermo Giménez de Castro

    Mackenzie Presbyterian University
    A Panorama on High Energy Solar Physics: Observations, Instrumentation and Theory

    A Solar Flare may release up to 10^32 erg of energy by heating the plasma and/or accelerating charged ambient particles. A non-negligible number of these particles are positive ions that have acquired energies sufficient for nuclear reactions. The pioneering theoretical work of Ramaty and Lingenfelter in the 1960s showed that these ions must be accompanied by highly relativistic secondary electrons and positrons. Since the 1980s gamma-ray detectors for energies around ~100 MeV have demonstrated their presence. However, gamma-ray detectors need to be in the outer space and there has been no solar-dedicated large area instrument so the evidence so far is rather sparse. The same particles, though, may emit at THz and sub-THz frequencies, a range as yet mostly unexplored. In this work we show millimeter and submillimeter observations that may suggest the presence of secondary particles. We then describe present and future instrumentation covering the flare spectrum from micro-waves to infrared. Finally we show ongoing theoretical work to model the expected emission using Monte Carlo simulation of primary ion transport, 3D magnetic field recons truction of the Corona and synchrotron calculations. The ongoing research has been benefited by a strong durable collaboration between the University of Glasgow in UK and Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie in Brazil that extends for around 40 years.

    Gimenez de Castro, C.G.; MacKinnon; A., Szpigel S.; Tuneu, J.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A.


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  • Stefan Söldner-Rembold

    Stefan Söldner-Rembold

    University of Manchester
  • Ettore Segreto

    Ettore Segreto

    The University of Campinas (UNICAMP)
    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment: Photon Detection System and ARAPUCA device

    One of the most important experimental programs that will address some of the open questions in neutrino physics is the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). It will be the first megascience project on the US sole, that actually involves more than 1000 physicists. It will allow to shade light, for example, on the mass hierarchy of neutrino masses and on the Charge-Parity symmetry violation in the leptonic sector, which can contribute to solve the puzzle of the matter/antimatter asymmetry in the Universe. The DUNE foresees the realization of a neutrino beam and of a near detector, both located at Fermilab (USA) and of a gigantic far detector based on the technology of liquid argon time projection chambers that will be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, 1300 km faraway. Furthermore, the huge active mass of the far detector will allow to develop a rich program of non accelerator physics that includes the search for proton decay, the detection of supernova neutrinos and of atmospheric neutrinos. The photon detection system is an important component of the far detector, which will be used for timing, triggering and to improve the energy resolution of the detector for low energy interactions. Its baseline design is based on a device totally conceived in Brazil, the ARAPUCA. Its operating principle is based on the combination of active silicon photon sensors with a passive collector. The latter allows to increase the effective detection efficiency of the active sensors by trapping the photons inside an highly reflective box. The Brazilian effort in developing and designing the Photon Detection System of the DUNE experiment will be illustrated.


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  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 05:30 p.m.
    closure
    Closure Day

February 12th

  • 08:30 a.m.
    discussion
    Round Table: Industry-University Research Collaboration

    Round Table: Industry-University Research Collaboration

    Chair: Wen Hwa Lee, Director, Oxford Martin Programme on Affordable Medicines, University of Oxford
    Sérgio Robles Reis de Queiroz, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Isro Gloger, GSK
    Helen Ewles, Royal Academy of Engineering

    Discussion

    Sérgio Robles Reis de Queiroz

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    Isro Gloger

    GSK Trust in Science, a novel model of Public-Private Partnership in Latin America

    The Trust in Science initiative was established by GSK in 2011 as a novel model for collaboration between Industry and Academic laboratories in partnership with public funding Agencies.
    This model was effectively implemented in Brasil and Argentina and since then it has expanded to other countries in the region.
    Since his creation more than 40 research projects have been funded in therapeutic areas such as Oncology, Neglected and Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Respiratory and Metabolic Diseases.
    In Brazil GSK established a very strong and effective partnership with FAPESP, allowing the funding of very important projects in key research institutions in the State of Sao Paulo.
    Details and strategic perspectives of the model will be presented as well as a highlight of key scientific achievements.

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    Helen Ewles

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  • 09:45 a.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • 10:00 a.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 04: New EnergiesChair: Geoff Rodgers, Vice-Provost Research, Brunel University London
  • Nigel Brandon

    Nigel Brandon

    Imperial College
    Innovation in electrochemical technologies to support a clean low carbon future

    Electrochemical technologies offer highly flexible and highly efficient means to move between energy carried in molecules and energy carried as electricity, and as such have the potential to play a critical role in the transition to low carbon energy systems, whilst also minimising other pollutants. This presentation will introduce the importance of technologies such as fuel cells, batteries and electrolysers in a clean low carbon future, and present some of the latest innovation and progress in the field.


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  • Julio R Meneghini

    Julio R Meneghini

    University of São Paulo (USP)
    Energy challenges for the 21st century and the role of innovative technologies: a path to a sustainable future

    This presentation deals with one of the greatest challenges for the 21st century: how to cope with an increasing demand for energy and climate change. The role of natural gas, biogas, hydrogen, and carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) is discussed with a particular focus on CO2 and other Green House Gas (GHG) emissions, contributing towards the Agenda 2030 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. The apparently conflicting tasks of reducing emissions and at the same time increasing the energy production is discussed in the framework of selected disruptive new technologies and innovative devices. The design of labyrinth seals to drastically reduce methane slip, compressors for CO2 in supercritical state, offshore salt caverns for methane and CO2 separation and storage, 3rd generation of supersonic gas separators, molecular dynamics for membrane design, among other technologies are going to be presented as part of ongoing research projects carried out at the Research Centre for Gas Innovation (RCGI), Centre with FAPESP and SHELL as the founding sponsors. These projects are being developed in a multidisciplinary fashion with researchers in areas ranging from engineering, fundamental physics and chemistry, mathematics, energy policies and economics, social science, psychology among others.


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  • Timothy Bugg

    Timothy Bugg

    University of Warwick
    Bacterial enzymes for lignin degradation: generating renewable chemicals from lignin

    The aromatic polymer lignin makes up 15-25% of plant cell wall lignocellulose, that is part of the bagasse residue from biofuel production, and is also generated as a by-product of pulp/paper manufacture. In order to make the biorefinery concept a reality around the world, it is important to find routes to convert lignin into renewable chemicals such as bioplastics and industrial chemicals. The seminar will discuss the discovery of new bacterial enzymes for lignin oxidation, such as DyP-type peroxidases and multi-copper oxidases, and the application of metabolic engineering to produce target bioproducts from lignin breakdown, including a new bio-plastic.


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  • Rubens Maciel Filho

    Rubens Maciel Filho

    University of Campinas (UNICAMP)
  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 11:30 a.m.
    break
    Transition Break
  • 11:40 a.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 05: Inequality, Social Inclusion and MigrationChair: Anthony Pereira, Director, King's Brazil Institute
  • Gareth Jones

    Gareth Jones

    London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
  • Eduardo Cesar Leão Marques

    Eduardo Cesar Leão Marques

    University of São Paulo (USP)
    The politics of urban policies in comparative perspective

    Cities are central to our economies, societies and daily lives, but we know relatively little how city governments really work. This gap is caused by a mutual lack of interest in local political institutions by both political science, which considers them as miniatures of the national ones, and urban studies, which believes that important processes lay in society, outside of the State. To help bridge this gap, we have been developing at the Center for Metropolitan Studies a large comparative research on the governance patterns that shape urban policies and politics in São Paulo, Paris, London, Mexico City and Milan, in collaboration with colleagues from these cities. The project has been showing that urban policies and politics present several peculiarities due to their relations with the territories of the cities, influencing the strategies and actions of actors such as local politicians, local bureaucracies, private companies who profit directly from the city and urban social movements. The project intends to shed light on who governs what, and who governs what the govern does not govern in the different policy fields of cities, considering State and not State actors connected by formal and informal, legal and illegal ties and surrounded by specific and historically constructed institutions and urban spaces. By focusing on the basic elements, processes and actors forge governance patterns, the project contributes to more systematic and general comparisons of the policies and politics of large cities in both the Global South and North.


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  • Paul Statham

    Paul Statham

    University of Sussex
  • Maria Alexandra da Cunha

    Maria Alexandra da Cunha

    Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV)
  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 01:10 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
  • 02:15 p.m.
    discussion
    Round Table - Scientific Communication in the 21st Century

    Round Table - Scientific Communication in the 21st Century

    Chair: Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Jan Piotrowski, The Economist
    Ben Deighton, SciDev.Net
  • 03:30 p.m.
    star
    Scientific Session 06: Water-Food-Energy NexusChair: BBSRC
  • Sacha Mooney

    Sacha Mooney

    University of Nottingham
  • Angelo Berchieri Junior

    Angelo Berchieri Junior

    São Paulo State University (UNESP)
    Avian salmonellosis of interest in poultry production and public health

    Line of researches: 1. Intestinal colonization by Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Heidelberg with defective genes related to the survival in the gut of chickens. 2. Antimicrobial and genotypic profile of S. Heidelberg. 3. Detection of Salmonella serotypes in laying hens. 4. Flagella versus immune response during the invasion process. 5.Assessment of the commercial products to control Salmonella spp.


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  • Darren Evans

    Darren Evans

    Newcastle University
  • Flavio Vieira Meirelles

    Flavio Vieira Meirelles

    University of São Paulo (USP)
  • Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 05:15 p.m.
    closure
    End of Event

February 13th

Technical visits for brazilian delegates.

Directions

Venue: The Royal Society
6-8 Carlton House Terrace, London, UK