November, 26 to 28th
CUNY Graduate Center

FAPESP Week New York

Organizers
Co-organizers

About

In 2018, from November 26 to 28, the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), The City University of New York (CUNY) and the Wilson Center will organize FAPESP WEEK NEW YORK. The symposium aims at strengthening the links between researchers from Brazil and the United States with the objective of promoting research partnerships.

FAPESP is one of the major funding agencies for scientific research in Brazil. Funded by the public taxpayer, its mission is to foster scientific research in all fields of knowledge by awarding scholarships, fellowships and grants to investigators linked with higher education and research institutions in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

FAPESP is aware that the very best research can only be done by working with the best researchers internationally. Therefore, it has established partnerships with funding agencies, higher education, private companies, and research organizations in other countries known by the quality of their research and has been encouraging scientists funded by its grants to further develop their international collaboration.

As part of these efforts, FAPESP has organized symposiums and exhibitions in several countries, in cities and states as Washington, D.C., Cambridge, North Carolina, California, Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska and Texas (US), Barcelona, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Toronto, Salamanca, Madrid, Tokyo, London, Beijing, Munich and Brussels.

The State of São Paulo has a population of 45 million and generates 32% of Brazil’s GDP. Under the State Constitution 1% of all state taxes are appropriated to fund FAPESP, which was put in motion in 1962.

The stability of the funding and the autonomy of the foundation allow for an efficient management of the resources that has had a sizable impact: while São Paulo has 16% of the Brazilian population and over 30% of the scientists with a doctorate in the country, the state responds for close to half of the country’s scientific articles published in international journals.

The effectiveness of research carried out in São Paulo is the combined result of several factors that include the quality of the state’s universities and institutes, the extraordinary productivity of its researchers, high rates of participation by private, São Paulo-based companies that function within the state’s R&D outlays, São Paulo’s outstanding infrastructure, and the existence of FAPESP, a well-designed state research-sponsoring agency governed, maintained by its directors with excellence and with autonomy over the past half century.

Within this context, in 2016 FAPESP applied $ PPP 533.9 million in scholarships and grants.

In accordance with the Foundation’s funding objectives, 39% of expenditure was earmarked for advancing knowledge, 8% was dedicated to supporting research infrastructure and 53% was allocated to supporting application-driven research.

FAPESP works in close contact with the scientific community: all proposals are peer reviewed with the help of panels composed of active researchers from the specific area. Many times scientists in São Paulo submit proposals for programs to the foundation which are carefully analyzed and, if deemed strong in academic terms, are shaped by the foundation into research programs that will constitute a set of related research projects in a given area.

Since FAPESP’s mandate is to foster research and scientific and technological development in the state, ideas for programs that couple world class research with contributions that will impact social problems are welcome.

Graduate Center

The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) is a leader in public graduate education devoted to enhancing the public good through pioneering research, serious learning, and reasoned debate. The Graduate Center offers ambitious students more than 40 doctoral and master's programs of the highest caliber, taught by top faculty from throughout CUNY - the nation's largest public urban university. Through its nearly 40 centers, institutes, and initiatives, including its Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC), The Graduate Center influences public policy and discourse and shapes innovation. The Graduate Center's extensive public programs make it a home for culture and conversation. The ASRC elevates scientific research and education at CUNY and beyond through initiatives in five distinctive but increasingly interconnected disciplines: environmental sciences, nanoscience, neuroscience, photonics, and structural biology. The ASRC promotes a collaborative, interdisciplinary research culture with renowned researchers from each of the initiatives working side-by-side in the ASRC's core facilities, sharing equipment that is among the most advanced available.

City University of New York (CUNY)

The City University of New York is the nation’s leading urban public university. Founded in 1847, CUNY counts 13 Nobel Prize and 23 MacArthur (“Genius”) grant winners among its alumni. CUNY students, alumni and faculty have garnered scores of other prestigious honors over the years in recognition of historic contributions to the advancement of the sciences, business, the arts and myriad other fields. The University comprises 25 institutions: 11 senior colleges, seven community colleges, William E. Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, CUNY Graduate Center, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, CUNY School of Law, CUNY School of Professional Studies and CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. The University serves more than 275,000 degree-seeking students. CUNY offers online baccalaureate and master’s degrees through the School of Professional Studies.

Directions

CUNY Graduate Center - New York
365 5th Ave, New York, NY 10016, EUA

Program

Overall Themes

  • Metropolis and Environmental Issues
  • Social Inequality
  • Neuroscience
  • Structural Biology
  • Photonics
  • Astronomy/Astrophysics
  • Fake New and Social Media in Political Campaigns
  • International Relations: USA x Brazil

November 26th

  • 08:30 a.m.
    registration
    Registration
  • 09:00 a.m.
    hello
    Opening Remarks and Welcome WordsChair: Joshua Brumberg (CUNY Representative)
  • star
    Technical Session 01: NeuroscienceChair: Mitchel Goldfarb (Hunter College & The Graduate Center, CUNY)
  • 09:10 a.m.
    Orie Shafer

    Orie Shafer

    Advanced Science Research Center, CUNY
    Circadian Timekeeping and Entrainment in Neuornal Clock Networks
  • 09:30 a.m.
    Iscia Lopes-Cendes

    Iscia Lopes-Cendes

    School of Medical Sciences / State University of Campinas (UNICAMP)
    An overview of the research projects developed at the Brazilian Institute of Neuroscience and Neurotecnology (BRAINN)

    BRAINN addresses mechanisms leading to epilepsy and stroke, disease onset and progression, the basis for plasticity and repair, together with the development of novel techniques and methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of brain disorders.

    The program involves objectives that go from clinical application to fundamental research in biology. Innovation and knowledge transfer are strong aspects of our Center. A multidisciplinary group of researchers, from physicians, biologists, physicists, and engineers were put together in this Center and are very well integrated to reach our mission.

    Research projects are mainly in the areas of i) genomic neuroscience and bioinformatics, ii) clinical and applied neuroscience; iii) neurorehabilitation and assistive technologies; iv) technological developments; and v) education and dissemination.

  • 09:50 a.m.
    Paul Firestein

    Paul Firestein

    Hunter College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    MouSensor: A platform to decode the sense of smell
  • 10:10 a.m.
    Thiago dos Santos Moreira

    Thiago dos Santos Moreira

    Biomedical Sciences Institute / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Understanding Mammalian Brainstem Circuits: Let Inspiration Guide the Way

    The underlying mechanisms governing breathing and its dynamics remain elusive and are much more complex than we thought. This lecture will address how novel emergent mechanisms, but not pacemakers, inhibition, or bursting, are likely to be critical and describe the roles of an important area in the brainstem involved in breathings automaticity and chemoreception, i.e the retrotrapezoid nucleus. The neural circuit controlling breathing is inimitably tractable and may inspire general strategies for elucidating other neural circuits.

  • 10:20 a.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 10:40 a.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • hello
    Official OpeningChair: TBD
  • 11:00 a.m.
    Marco Antonio Zago

    Marco Antonio Zago

    President of São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Opening Remarks and Welcome Words
  • 11:15 a.m.
    Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

    Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

    São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Presentation of FAPESP Scientific Director
  • 11:55 a.m.
    Chase Robinson <i>(President)</i> and Stephen Brier

    Chase Robinson (President) and Stephen Brier

    The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Overview of CUNY and Presentation about the History of CUNY
  • 12:40 p.m.
    Lunch and Round Table: International Relations Brazil x USA

    Lunch and Round Table: International Relations Brazil x USA

    Chair: Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva – Fapesp
    Felipe Loureiro, Institute of International Relations / University of São Paulo (USP)
    Desmond Arias, Marxe Chair of Western Hemisphere Affairs (Baruch College)
    Paulo Sotero, Wilson Center

    Abstract - Felipe Loureiro

    Trends of the US-Brazilian Relations under Trump and Bolsonaro:
    What History Can Tell Us About Them?

    Several comparisons have been drawn between today’s Brazil and that of the post-1964 military coup. Similar to nowadays, early 1960s Brazil also faced serious economic problems, experienced heated debates about the need for structural reforms, had a left-wing government ousted from power, and saw the ascension of a fiercely pro-US regime that promised to save the country from populist corruption and Communism in the name of Western conservative values. Taking into account the profound and significant differences between both periods, this presentation analyses possible trends in US-Brazilian relations during the Bolsonaro and Trump presidencies using the past as key parameter. We look at how bilateral relations evolved during the first years of the Brazilian military dictatorship (1964-1985) and suggest parallels with those to be developed between the largest countries of the hemisphere from January 2019 onwards.

  • 01:20 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
  • star
    Technical Session 02: Social InequalityChair: TBD
  • 02:00 p.m.
    Leslie McCall

    Leslie McCall

    The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Public Opinion Regarding Inequality, Opportunity, and Redistribution
  • 02:20 p.m.
    Sérgio França Adorno de Abreu

    Sérgio França Adorno de Abreu

    Faculty of Philosophy, Languages and Literature, and Human Sciences / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Building Democracy Daily: Human Rights, Violence and Institutional Trust

    The presentation is based on ongoing CEPID/FAPESP institutional research project whose purpose focuses on the way in which laws, rules and procedures are implemented over time and how this defines the legitimacy of key institutions,mainly police and judiciary tribunals, to prevent violence and garantee democracy. The objective here is to study how laws, rules and ordinances are applied every day by civil servants in local government institutions (the importance of the performance of institutions), seeking out relationships about how they can affect social and institutional trust, as well as compliance with the law and/or the willingness to obey laws. We have been exploring how macro- and micro-level phenomena come together and impact each other. To answer the proposed questions, the research focused on three different perspectives: community, civil servants, and youth. For each of these groups, the study has used mixed methodologies. To understand the perspective of citizens and adolescents, longitudinal panels have been carried out. The reasons for this are twofold: first, to establish causality; second, because social changes take place very rapidly, and so a longitudinal study with multiple points of contact is necessary. To understand the perspective of civil servants, we have been using surveys and interviews.

  • 02:40 p.m.
    Miles Corak

    Miles Corak

    The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Intergenerational mobility between and within Canada and the United States
  • 03:00 p.m.
    Eliseu Savério Sposito

    Eliseu Savério Sposito

    Sciences and Technology School / Sao Paulo State University (UNESP)
    Inequalities in middle cities: segregation, self-segregation and sócio-spatial fragmentations

    Socio-spatial inequalities feature the urbanization in Latin America, a subcontinent where cities reveal and reproduce its own history of economic, political and cultural inequities. Considering this reality as a general process, we study its particularities in middle cities, understood as an urban network stratum and as space for articulations on multiple geographical scales in the contemporary period (globalization). The means to carry out this analysis has been consumption, associated with the role of credit, as a level to understand the process of production and consumption in/of urban space, focusing on segregation and self-segregation, to show how this dialectical pair converges to a larger and more complex process that we call socio-spatial fragmentation. The researches have been conducted through a quali-quantitative methodology, giving voices to townsmen to understand how the changes under way modify their spatial practices, and taking as reference the points of view of agents who have economic and political power, elements that reveal the substance of socioeconomic indicators.

  • 03:20 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 03:40 p.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • star
    Technical Session 03: Structural BiologyChair: Richard Magliozzo – Brooklyn College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
  • 04:00 p.m.
    Kevin Gardner

    Kevin Gardner

    Advanced Science Research Center, CUNY
    Environmentally-controlled protein/protein interactions: Nature’s switches, Scientists’ Tools
  • 04:20 p.m.
    Denise Vilarinho Tambourgi

    Denise Vilarinho Tambourgi

    Butantan Institute
    Brown recluse spider envenomation: toxins, action mechanism and treatment

    Loxosceles (brown recluse) spider venom consists of a mixture of proteins, including the sphingomyelinases D (SMases D), which are the main toxic components responsible for local and systemic effects in human envenomation. In accidents with Loxosceles spiders, a variety of therapeutic interventions have been proposed. However, a definitive and completely effective treatment has not yet been established. Based on venom molecular action mechanisms and SMase D structural data, inhibitors able to control systemic and cutaneous events of the loxoscelism have been identified, and one of these inhibitors is already in Phase III of clinical trial in Brazil.

  • 04:40 p.m.
    Nicholas Biais

    Nicholas Biais

    Brooklyn College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Superheroes of the human microbiota: an introduction to mechano-micro-biology
  • 05:00 p.m.
    Richard Charles Garratt

    Richard Charles Garratt

    Sao Carlos Physics Institute / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Molecular recognition and filament assembly by mammalian septins

    Molecular recognition is a process essential to life but unpacking the details of such highly selective interactions is frequently not trivial. The assembly of a physiologically functional septin filament, for example, is a process which requires exquisite molecular recognition. Such filaments are fundamental to a wide range of intracellular processes such as cell division, exocytosis, vesicle trafficking, membrane barrier formation and the production of defensive cages against bacterial infection. Not surprisingly, mutational defects or ectopic expression of septins have been associated with important pathologies such as male infertility, amyloidoses and certain malignancies. Over the course of the past decade our major contributions to the field have concentrated on the determination of the only high-resolution crystal structures of human septin domains currently available. Although providing a vast amount of important information, this static view of septin structure has its limitations. We have therefore endeavoured to bring the full arsenal of structural biology techniques (NMR, EM, CD, SPR etc.) to bear on dissecting the filament and its higher order structures. In the course of these investigations we have discovered a completely novel dimeric anti-parallel coiled-coil structure, have observed for the first time a heterotypic interface between septins which has a greatly increased interfacial area, described the squeezing of one of the interfaces as an explanation for membrane association and disassociation and have attributed selectivity, at least in part, to the coiled coil sequences within the C-terminal domains. These advances will be briefly described.

    Financial support:
    FAPESP (Thematic Project 2014/15546-1)

  • 05:20 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 07:30 p.m.
    closure
    End of Day 1

November 27th

  • star
    Technical Session 04: PhotonicsChair: Euclides Almeida - Queens College & The Graduate Center CUNY
  • 09:00 a.m.
    Azriel Genack

    Azriel Genack

    Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Uncovering coherence in transport in disordered media
  • 09:20 a.m.
    Thiago Pedro Mayer Alegre

    Thiago Pedro Mayer Alegre

    Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute / State University of Campinas (UNICAMP)
    Light and sound interaction in photonic structures

    The tight confinement provided by physical structures can be used to tune or enhances the dynamical coupling between photon, electrons and phonons. In photonic structures, such enhancement enables a range of novel functionalities as changing the color of light, generating radio-frequency signals, suppressing stimulated light scattering and manipulating mesoscopic phonon modes. In any of these cases a fine control over the design and fabrication of the microstructure, that shapes the optical and acoustic phonon spectra, as well as their interaction are required. In this talk, I will show some of our recent results in this field that relies on patterning standard dielectric nano-waveguides and cavities to enhance or suppress these interactions as well as the prospects of using integrated photonics towards their practical and fundamental applications. I will also briefly describe our micro-fabrication facilities and an innovate initiative that brought few groups together to build a Photonic Research Center at Unicamp - Photonicamp.

  • 09:40 a.m.
    Andrea Alu

    Andrea Alu

    Advanced Science Research Center, CUNY
    Controlling light with metamaterials
  • 10:00 a.m.
    Christiano José Santiago de Matos

    Christiano José Santiago de Matos

    Graphene and Nanomaterials Research Center / Mackenzie Presbyterian University
    Optics and Photonics with 2D materials

    Since graphene’s isolation in 2004, atomically-thin crystals are finding an increasing number of applications in areas as diverse as electronics, biomedical sensing, and materials engineering. The light-2D material interaction has shown to be rather strong, particularly in the case of 2D semiconductors, not only enabling the observation of peculiar effects, but also suggesting several photonic applications. In this talk, the linear and nonlinear optical characterization of a number of layered and two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, black phosphorus and molybdenum disulfide will be shown, and some of their applications discussed. For example, frequency conversion via harmonic generation will be presented and its efficiency in different 2D materials compared. The unusual Raman properties of black phosphorus will be described, as well as the application of a nanocomposite material as a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensor, both on a planar geometry and in an optofluidic capillary fiber.

  • 10:20 a.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 10:40 a.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • star
    Technical Session 05: Metropolis and Environmental IssuesChair: TBD
  • 11:00 a.m.
    Tammy Lewis

    Tammy Lewis

    Brooklyn College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Green Gentrification in Brooklyn and Global Cities
  • 11:20 a.m.
    Pedro Roberto Jacobi

    Pedro Roberto Jacobi

    Energy and Environment Institute / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Challenges for São Paulo Macrometropolitan Environmental Governance - an agenda of research and policy responses

    Facing the evidence of global warming, the presentation will approach environmental governance in a scale that transcends the metropolitan scale, emphasizing the analysis of the impacts of wide processes of environmental degradation and liability, and propose initiatives and actions that will compose an agenda of innovative interfaces in three axes- governance, nexus and territorial transitions.

  • 11:40 a.m.
    William Solecki

    William Solecki

    Hunter College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Presentation S5.3
  • 12:00 p.m.
    Maria de Fátima Andrade

    Maria de Fátima Andrade

    Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Air quality in the megacity of São Paulo: Evolution over the last 30 years and future perspectives

    The Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP) is the most populous region in the Southern Hemisphere and presents concentration of ozone and particulate matter that usually overcome the air quality standards, due mainly to the vehicular sources. Other sources have minor impact in the air quality, as the contribution from biomass burning (associated to agricultural process ), charcoal and wood burning (for cooking) and industrial/cement emissions. The number of on-road vehicles and the corresponding sales in fuel in MASP have increased substantially over the past 10 years, however, the total emissions have decreased due to the legislations imposing restrictions on emissions. But hotspots of pollution are found close to the population mainly during commuting. Recent research is focused in the exposition of the commuters to fine particles and black carbon in the public transport (bus and metro) and cars, related to the transport oriented development in cities.


    Short Bio

    Prof. Maria de Fatima Andrade is a full professor at the Atmospheric Sciences Department in the University of São Paulo, she coordinates the “Laboratory for Analysis of Atmospheric Process (LAPAt)”. She has Master and PhD in Physics and has being working with atmospheric aerosols and air quality modeling for more than 30 years. Her projects are related to the description of emission, transformation and removal process of atmospheric constituents. She has been involved in many projects related to air quality in urban areas of Brazil, mainly São Paulo Metropolitan Area. Her research has contributed in the evaluation of the emission factors from vehicular sources, ozone and secondary particles formation, and air quality modeling. Her research is interdisciplinary involving urban air pollution and health impacts, transport of pollutants and new technologies for aerosol measurements. The most recent project is related to the commuters’ exposure to fine particles in the transport system. She has advised more than 30 graduation students and published over 100 journal articles. She has extensive experience in international scientific cooperation.

  • 12:20 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 12:40 p.m.
    Lunch and Round Table: Social Media and Fake News in Political Campaigns

    Lunch and Round Table: Social Media and Fake News in Political Campaigns

    Chair: Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva – Fapesp
    Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Paulo Sotero, Wilson Center
    Eugênio Bucci, School of Communications and Arts (USP)
    Carrie Brown, CUNY Newmark J School
    Rachel Ramirez, The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Barbara Gray, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism, CUNY
    Michelle Strah, John Jay College, CUNY

    Abstract - Eugênio Bucci

    The Democracy out of Facts

    The surprising out-coming of the presidential Brazilian campaign this year attested the demoralization of traditional politicians. A candidate with no representative party basis won the elections. The propaganda of the winners was based on hatred and resentment, often associated with the so-called fake news. After the 2018 elections, Brazilian democracy is a little further from the debate of facts, as Hannah Arendt addresses in her essay "Truth and Politics." In my talk, I intend to reflect on the Brazilian context from some Hannah Arendt's propositions.


    Abstract - Carlos Eduardo Lins da Silva

    The use of social media to disseminate fake news during the 2018 electoral campaign in Brazil

    The use of social media to disseminate fake news during the 2018 electoral campaign in Brazil was one of the hottest in Brazilian political season. Several fact checking initiatives were taken by the academia, journalistic vehicles and the social media companies themselves. The controversy shows that good quality academic research is more necessary than ever to assess how much fake news is able to influence voter behavior.

  • star
    Technical Session 06: Astronomy/AstrophysicsChair: Matthew O'Dowd - CUNY
  • 02:20 p.m.
    Barry McKernan

    Barry McKernan

    BMCC & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Disks, Black Holes, and Gravitational Waves
  • 02:40 p.m.
    Elisabete Maria de Gouveia Dal Pino

    Elisabete Maria de Gouveia Dal Pino

    Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Presentation S6.2
  • 03:00 p.m.
    Saavik Ford

    Saavik Ford

    BMCC & The Graduate Center, CUNY
    Bread and Butter Astrophysics with GW Events
  • 03:20 p.m.
    Jorge Ernesto Horvath

    Jorge Ernesto Horvath

    Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences / University of Sao Paulo (USP)
    Superdense matter in the Universe

    We address in this presentation the main reasearch activities undertaken in São Paulo state within the Project "Superdense matter in the Universe" Theoretical, phenomenological and experimental/observational research aiming to characterize the state of matter at supranuclear densities and low temperatures, the regime corresponding to astrophysical settings is described. In particular, work on exotic states (quark matter), the nature of magnetized "neutron" stars and the issue of magnetized white dwarfs, alternative theories of gravitation appleud to compact objects and hard X-ray instrumentation is presented, with emphasis on the opportunities of collaboration and interfaces with related research ares.

  • 03:40 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 04:00 p.m.
    break
    Coffee break
  • 04:20 p.m.
    Round Table: Perspectives for Future Collaborations

    Round Table: Perspectives for Future Collaborations

    Chair: TBD
    Daniel McCloskey, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor and University Vice Provost for Research, CUNY
    Joy ConollyProvost & Senior Vice President, The Graduate Center, CUNY
  • 05:00 p.m.
    discussion
    Closing Remarks - FAPESP and CUNY
  • 06:00 p.m.
    closure
    End of Day 2

November 28th

Technical visits for brazilian delegates.