November, 21-22nd
Auditorium MalrauxCampus Manufacture des Tabacs, Lyon
November, 25-27th
Amphithéatre BuffonParis

FAPESP Week France

News

About

The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP), in partnership with Université de Lyon and Université de Paris, is promoting FAPESP WEEK France in November, 2019. The symposium aims to promote new research partnerships and to strengthen the existing collaboration between researchers from France and from Brazil.

FAPESP Week France will take place at the Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 from November 21st and 22nd, and at the Université Paris Diderot from November 25th to 27th.

FAPESP is one of the major funding agencies for scientific research in Brazil. Funded by the public taxpayer, its mission is to foster scientific research in all fields of knowledge by awarding scholarships, fellowships and grants to investigators linked with higher education and research institutions based in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

The State of São Paulo has a population of 45 million and generates 32% of Brazil’s GDP. Under the State Constitution 1% of all state taxes are appropriated to fund FAPESP, which was put in motion in 1962.

The stability of the funding and the autonomy of the foundation allow for an efficient management of the resources that has had a sizable impact: while São Paulo has 16% of the Brazilian population and over 30% of the scientists with a doctorate in the country, the state responds for close to half of the country’s scientific articles published in international journals.

The effectiveness of research carried out in São Paulo is the combined result of several factors that include the quality of the state’s universities and institutes, the extraordinary productivity of its researchers, high rates of participation by private São Paulo-based companies that function within the state’s R&D outlays, São Paulo’s outstanding infrastructure, and the existence of FAPESP.

FAPESP is aware that the very best research can only be done by working with the best researchers internationally. Therefore, it has established partnerships with funding agencies, private companies, higher education and research organizations in other countries known by the quality of their research. With this, has been encouraging scientists funded by its grants to further develop their international collaboration. Agreements are listed here: www.fapesp.br/agreements.

As part of these efforts, FAPESP has organized FAPESP WEEKs in several countries, including in Argentina, Belgium, Canada, China, Germany, Japan, Spain, United Kingdom, United States, and Uruguay. Read more about the symposia at www.fapesp.br/fapespweek.

In 2018 FAPESP applied $ PPP 599.4 million in scholarships/fellowships and grants. In accordance with the Foundation’s funding strategies, 51% of expenditure was dedicated to Basic and Applied Research, 24% to Human Resources for Research, 10% to support Research Infrastructure, 9.5% to Research for Innovation, 4.5% Strategic Research and 1% was allocated to Communicating Science to the Public.

Université de Lyon

The Université de Lyon is a world-class academic site of excellence providing training and research opportunities in all scientific domains in line with current social expectations. It regroups around thirty higher education institutions accounting for 140,000 students, 5,300 PhD students, 6,800 researchers.

Université de Paris

At the heart of a global network of knowledge and innovation, Université de Paris is France’s leading multidisciplinary university. It covers a wide range of disciplines, with one of the most comprehensive and ambitious educational offerings available in the world. Université de Paris is part of the incarnation of a world city, aware of its place and missions, open to youth and knowledge.


Lyon

  • Machine Learning and Data Science
  • Photonics
  • Atmosphere and Health Issues
  • Particles Drifting and Propelling in Turbulent Flows
  • Philosophy
  • Urban Issues at Large (Risks, Infrastructure, and Social Movements)
  • Micro-be-have (insects, control, diseases, environment, and economic impact)
  • Strategies for International Collaboration – roundtable with universities from Sao Paulo and Lyon

Paris

  • Amazon and Climate Research
  • Psychology and Psychoanalysis
  • Earth Studies
  • Migration, Urban mobility, and Urban Social Issues
  • Life Sciences
  • Strategies for International Collaboration
  • Materials, nano, and bionano materials
  • Funding Mechanisms for International collaboration - roundtable with research funding agencies
  • Strategies for International Collaboration – roundtable with universities from Sao Paulo and Paris

ProgrammeLyon / November, 21-22nd

Thursday, November 21st

  • 08:30 a.m.
    registration
    Registration
  • 09:00 a.m.
    hello
    Opening Session / Welcome

    Opening Session / Welcome

    Jacques Comby, President of Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3 and Vice-President International Strategy of Université de Lyon
    Marco Antonio Zago, President, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
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    Technical Session 1: Machine Learning and Data ScienceChair: Munir Skaf, Vice-President for Research University of Campinas - UNICAMP
  • 09:30 a.m.
    Alexandre Xavier Falcão

    Alexandre Xavier Falcão

    Institute of Computing, University of Campinas
    Interactive Machine Learning for Image Data Science

    We aim at training machines to extract information from images in view of assisting humans in making decisions, supporting research in distinct areas, and creating (semi)automated tools for the industry. Such a task often requires prior image annotation with considerable expert effort for delimiting regions (examples) in training images and annotating the categories that the machine should learn to predict in new (test) images. This classical strategy leaves unanswered several questions, such as: (1) How many annotated examples are needed? (2) Which are the best examples? (3) Can we explain the decisions of the machine? (4) Has the machine learned to solve the problem or the image dataset? (5) What can humans and machines learn from each other? The talk outlines our methodology to include experts as part of the machine learning loop in view of answering those questions. We combine image processing, information visualization, and machine learning techniques with the ability of humans (experts) to abstract knowledge for the design of reliable and explainable decision- making systems. The talk provides evidence that supports our strategy, illustrates results from a few applications, and concludes with our current research topics.


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  • 09:50 a.m.
    Pablo Jensen

    Pablo Jensen

    CNRS & Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon
  • 10:10 a.m.
    Nina Sumiko Tomita Hirata

    Nina Sumiko Tomita Hirata

    Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, University of São Paulo
    Machine learning in image analysis: new challenges and perspectives

    Recent developments in deep neural networks are enabling large advances in computer vision and image analysis, including a shift towards higher semantic level tasks. These advances also surface new challenges: How these models work and how to control them ? How to go beyond data that have been observed or we are able to label? I will discuss some initiatives in our research group towards representation modeling both in the context of image content and image transformations, and how these can be incorporated into machine learning processes for better understanding of the models. I will also discuss some ongoing applications that illustrate the need for approaches to deal with unlabeled and not yet seen data, and how we are addressing these issues.


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  • 10:30 a.m.
    Patrice Abry

    Patrice Abry

    CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon
  • 10:50 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 11:10 a.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Presentation of host institutions
  • 11:30 a.m.
    Jean-François Pinton

    Jean-François Pinton

    President of ENS Lyon and PI of the IDEX project
    Overview of IDEX Lyon program
    Speaker 1
  • 11:30 a.m.
    François Pellegrino

    François Pellegrino

    IDEX manager
    Overview of IDEX Lyon program
    Speaker 2
  • 12:10 p.m.
    Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

    Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

    FAPESP Scientific Director
    Presentation of FAPESP

    Graduated in Electronic Engineering from ITA in 1978. Obtained the title of Master of Science in 1980 and the Doctor of Sciences in 1983, at the Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, Unicamp. He was avisiting researcher at the Università degli Studi in Rome, visting researcher at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and a resident visitor at Bell Laboratories of AT&T in Holmdel, NJ and in Murray Hill, NJ. His research is in ultrafast phenomena using ultra-short laser pulses, with emphasis on the study of electronic processes in the time-scale of femtoseconds in nonlinear optical materials aimed for applications in optical communications. Brito Cruz was Director of the Physics Institute ?Gleb Wataghin?, Unicamp and the Dean for Research at Unicamp. He has been the Vice President of the Brazilian Society of Physics and member of the Advisory Board of the International Optical Society of America. He is a member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. He was President of the São Paulo Research Foundation, FAPESP, from 1996 to 2002 and Rector of Unicamp from April 2002 to April 2005. He has been the President of the Board of Technology and Competitiveness of FIESP (2005-2012). Since April 2005, Brito Cruz is the Scientific Director of FAPESP.


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  • 12:50 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
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    Technical Session 2: PhotonicsChair: Sylvio Canuto, Vice President for Research of the University of São Paulo
  • 02:00 p.m.
    Christian Seassal

    Christian Seassal

    INL, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, UMR CNRS5270

    Christian Seassal is Senior Researcher at the French CNRS, and Deputy Director of the Lyon Institute of Nanotechnology (INL). He graduated from INSA de Lyon (1993) and received his PhD from École Centrale de Lyon in 1997. His research activities concern photonic nanostructures and their applications for integrated photonics and solar photovoltaics. He has authored and co-authored about 110 research papers in international journals, and of over 50 invited conferences. He is member of the Optical Society (OSA), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Materials Research Society (MRS). He is deputy editor of the OSA Optics Express Journal, and editor of its supplement Energy Express. He received the French CNRS bronze medal in 2002.


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  • 02:20 p.m.
    Felippe Barbosa

    Felippe Barbosa

    Institute of Physics, University of Campinas
    Towards Integrated Quantum Photonics

    The field of integrated photonics has been at the forefront of scientific and technological research for well over a decade. More recently, developments on integrated photonic platforms have also prompted progress on other research fields such as nonlinear optics, microfluidics, machine learning and quantum information. The current dissemination of integrated photonic devices and further development of fabrication techniques are expected to bring even more interesting technology and groundbreaking research. In this talk, I will discuss the main developments of integrated photonics research, its current state and future perspectives regarding its application on quantum information science. I will also talk about the many research developments that have been spearheaded by integrated photonics techniques in the state of São Paulo.


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  • 02:40 p.m.
    Milan Sinobad

    Milan Sinobad

    INL, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, UMR CNRS5270
  • 03:00 p.m.
    Paulo Alberto Nussenzveig

    Paulo Alberto Nussenzveig

    Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo

    Bachelor in Physics from Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (1988), master's in Physics from Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (1990) and Ph.D. in "Physique Quantique" from Université Pierre et Marie Curie (1994). Visiting Professor at Cornell University in 2012. Member of the Scientific Council of the "Fundação Instituto de Física Teórica" (Principia Foundation) and former Member of the International Council of the Optical Society (OSA), from 2014-2018. Topical Editor of Optics Letters and former Associate Editor of the Brazilian Journal of Physics. Full Professor at the Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo. Currently Head of the Graduate Program in Physics at the Instituto de Fisica. Member of the Scientific Advisory Board in Physics at the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP). Presenter of ?Science and Scientists? on Radio USP. His main interests are in Quantum Optics, Atomic Physics, and Quantum Information.


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  • 03:20 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 03:40 p.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Technical Session 3: Atmosphere and Health IssuesChair: Rodrigo Calado, Medicine School of Ribeirão Preto - USP
  • 04:00 p.m.
    Anne Helene Fostier

    Anne Helene Fostier

    Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas
    Mercury fate and transport in the Amazonian forest

    Mercury (Hg) is a neurotoxic element, classified as a global pollutant by the United Nations Environment Programme. In terrestrial environment the largest pools are in soils that act as sinks of atmospheric Hg due to its substantial uptake by plants and litter deposition. The Amazonian forest covers 5.5 10 6 km 2 and accounts for half of the planet’s remaining rainforests, with its main area (60%) in the Brazilian territory. It is therefore a main issue to understand the role of this ecosystem in the global and regional Hg cycle. Over the last 20 years, our researches, largely supported by FAPESP funding and carried out in collaboration with many Brazilian and foreign institutions, have been contributing to understand how natural and anthropogenic disturbances of this ecosystem, such as climate change, deforestation, forest burning, and mining activities can affect the mercury fate and transport in the Amazonian forest. Our most recent researches included Hg stable isotopes as tracers of Hg emissions/deposition, Hg chemical speciation in order to better understand the role of tropical soils in Hg methylation and the use of nanomaterials to develop passive Hg samplers for atmospheric Hg monitoring.


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  • 04:20 p.m.
    Christian George

    Christian George

    IRCELYON - Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement de Lyon
  • 04:40 p.m.
    Arnaldo Alves Cardoso

    Arnaldo Alves Cardoso

    Chemistry Institute in Araraquara (IQAr), São Paulo State University
    Impact on atmospheric chemistry during Biofuel Ethanol Production: Past, current trends and future perspectives

    Changes caused by land use, expansion of agro-industry, and growth of industrial may lead to a variety of collateral effects. One of these is the modification of the composition of the atmosphere, with possible consequent adverse effects on ecosystems and human health. Brazil is the world's largest producer of sugar cane. The main sugar cane producing region is located in São Paulo State, which has the highest population density in Brazil, and an economy based largely on agroindustry. The state of São Paulo has 55% of the sugarcane planted area in Brazil. In the 2017/2018 harvest, 13 billion liters of ethanol were produced, which corresponded to 47% of Brazil's production.

    Until 2002, the harvest was manual and required the previous burning of sugarcane. This activity was a significant source of gases and particulate matter to the atmosphere. Studies by our group characterized emissions of gases and particles into the atmosphere. Among the environmental consequences, we can mention atmospheric deposition of macronutrient species and changes in particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei. State Law of 2002 and an agreement signed between the ethanol/sugar industry and the São Paulo State government envisaged an elimination of burning, by 2017. In the 2016/17 harvest, the manually harvested production was 43.6 million tons, representing 10% of the total produced in the harvest.

    Air quality data from CETESB, an environmental company in the state of São Paulo, do not show significant improvement in air quality. These facts suggest that possibly the type of emission sources has changed in quality but not in quantity. Studies on the atmosphere of the region should be intensified to help develop strategies to manage sources emissions of gas and particles.


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  • 05:00 p.m.
    Dr Alain Géloën

    Dr Alain Géloën

    Laboratoire CARMEN, INSA Lyon

    Dr. Alain Géloën. CNRS Research Director, member of Cardiovascular, Metabolism, Diabetologia and Nutrition (CarMeN) Laboratory (UMR INSERM 1060, INSA Lyon). His scientific interests cover physiological studies of energy regulation in homeotherms, development of adipose tissues as well as application of nanomaterials in cell and animal physiology. As a member of CarMeN laboratory, A. Géloën coordinates and supervises biological parts of the research projects, in particular the tests carried out on cell cultures. 124 original publications, 1 general review, 4 patents.


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  • 05:20 p.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 05:40 p.m.
    closure
    End of Day 1

Friday, November 22nd

  • 09:00 a.m.
    discussion
    Round Table: The Universities in the State of São Paulo and the Université de Lyon: Strategies for International Collaboration

    Round Table: The Universities in the State of São Paulo and the Université de Lyon: Strategies for International Collaboration

    Chair: Carlos Vergani, UNESP
    Pr. Anne Giroir-Fendler, Vice-President International Mobility, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1
    Carlos Gilberto Carlotti Jr., Vice President Graduate Studies, University of São Paulo
    Guillaume Rousset, Vice-President International Relations, Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3
    Carlos Graeff, Vice-President for Research, São Paulo State University
    Stéphane Riou, Vice-President for Research, Université Jean Monnet Saint-Étienne
    Munir Skaf, Vice-President for Research, University of Campinas
  • 10:00 a.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Technical Session 4: Particles drifting and propelling in turbulent flowsChair: Paulo Alberto Nussenzweig, Physics Institute, USP
  • 10:20 a.m.
    Pr. Andro Mikelić

    Pr. Andro Mikelić

    Institut Camille Jordan, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1
  • 10:40 a.m.
    Livia Souza Freire Grion

    Livia Souza Freire Grion

    Institute of Mathematics and Computer Sciences (USP)
    Particle transport in the atmosphere: an unsolved problem

    The presence of airborne particles is relevant to a variety of environmental and human activities, including agriculture, meteorology, air quality and health. To predict the behavior of particles, such as their concentration at a given location and time, it is necessary to understand the turbulent flow present in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Due to its complex nature, the study of turbulence has relied on the use of numerical simulations combined with the analysis of experimental data. For the atmospheric flow, the use of a special kind of simulation, known as a Large Eddy Simulation (LES), has provided important insights regarding the unique behavior of turbulence, and significant progress has been made in developing models for the transport of matter and energy in the atmosphere under simplified conditions. For example, the mean concentration of fine particles emitted from a region of flat, bare soil can be represented by a simple flux-profile relationship, a result found through using LES. Advances in computing power capabilities provide an opportunity to investigate more complex problems, such as the transport of particles in the presence of forests and cities; improving LES for this purpose is the subject of ongoing research funded by Fapesp. This advanced numerical tool will be used to develop new models for the transport of particles, which will increase our understanding of and our ability to predict their role in the environment.


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  • 11:00 a.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
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    Technical Session 5: PhylosophyChair: Fernando Menezes, FAPESP
  • 11:10 a.m.
    Sérgio Cardoso

    Sérgio Cardoso

    School of Philosophy, Literature and Human Sciences, University of São Paulo
    Current political philosophy studies in São Paulo

    The presentation will indicate the interest of the studies produced by our universities on three great moments of the ruptures of political thinking in the onset of modernity (e.g. the works of Maquiavel, Bodin and Montaigne) to the contemporary debates concerned with the deficits of democratic and republican demands of our political regimes: its authoritarian or populist deviations, the impasses of democratic representation, the narrowing of values and practices of liberal horizons of modernity. We will suggest researches, thesis and books produced in the course of these investigations, as well as their affinities with works developed in France.


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  • 11:30 a.m.
    Thierry Gontier

    Thierry Gontier

    Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3

    Full Professor (classe exceptionnelle) at the University Jean Moulin-Lyon 3 Director of the Institut de recherches philosophiques de Lyon (IRPhiL - EA-4187). Hononary Member of the Institut universitaire de France (IUF).


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  • 11:50 a.m.
    Alberto Ribeiro Gonçalves de Barros

    Alberto Ribeiro Gonçalves de Barros

    School of Philosophy, Literature and Human Sciences, University of São Paulo
    English republicanism and neo-republicanism: a critical approach

    The intention is to present some results of my previous research on English republicanism and the initial hypothesis of my current research on neo-republicanism. Studies on English republicanism and its conception of liberty have taken a prominent place in the republican revival of the last decades. Since the publication of John Pocock´s The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (1975), English republicanism has been commonly interpreted as a manifestation of Machiavelli´s republicanism, which was posteriorly transmitted to the American colonies and had an important role in the American Revolution and the formation of American values. In my recent works, I argued that the acceptance of Machiavelli’s republicanism by 17th century British authors, such as John Milton, James Harrington, Marchamont Nedham, and Algernon Sidney, was only partial, limited to its statements, without its assumptions. By adapting it to defend the republican regime, they modified its most important principles and abandoned what was most original in it. Indeed, English republicanism was more the expression of classical republicanism combined with Common law principles in a modern political language of interests than the manifestation of Machiavelli’s republicanism. In the last years, the two main exponents of neo-republicanism – Quentin Skinner and Philip Pettit – have proposed to recover the republican conception of liberty as non-domination in order to overcome the dichotomy in the contemporary political debate between negative liberty and positive liberty. My initial hypothesis is that this conception does not correspond to the meaning given by all republican tradition. It expresses only the perspective of English republicanism, distancing itself from important sources of modern republicanism such as the political thought of Machiavelli and Rousseau. In so doing, it ceases to be an alternative to that dichotomy and becomes only an improved version of negative liberty.


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  • 12:10 p.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 12:20 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
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    Technical Session 6: Urban Issues at Large(Risks, Infrastructure, Social Movements)Chair: Ana Lucia Duarte Lanna, Architecture School, USP
  • 02:20 p.m.
    Paula Freire Santoro

    Paula Freire Santoro

    School of Architecture and Urbanism, University of São Paulo
    Entanglements between urban development and popular territories in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    This investigation intends to contribute to the construction of a framework to approach contemporary restructuring processes in Metropolitan Sao Paulo based on a trans- and multiscalar perspective. This perspective aims to identify in the territory, the entanglements that relate the present stage of accumulation - lead or not by the financial logic, praxis and metrics adopted by players in and outside the State; and the symbolic reconfiguration of the role of players in and outside of the State. The central hypothesis is that we are facing new regimes of territorial control and production which reconfigure the city and are constituted of: (i) a new regime of accumulation marked by the advance of financial capital; (ii) new processes of production, planning, control and management lead by a increasing incorporation of private players and the financial sector; (iii) new means of production, funding and management of low income housing which imply in new sociabilities trespassed by conflict, appropriations, negotiations and dispossession (displacements); and (iv) new political injunctions which involve, amongst others, processes of insurgency and emplacement derived by the agency of the subjects. The Central, Northern and Eastern parts of metropolitan Sao Paulo, each one in three different scales, are taken as linkage that articulate elements and points of observation and connection.


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  • 02:40 p.m.
    Fabrice Bardet

    Fabrice Bardet

    Université de Lyon, ENTPE (Graduate School of Civil, Environmental and Urban Engineering)
    Financialization of urban policies
  • 03:00 p.m.
    Bernardo Mançano Fernandes

    Bernardo Mançano Fernandes

    Institute for Public Policy and International Relations, São Paulo State University
    Socioterritorial movements and sustainable development

    There is a global agrarian question regarding peasant agriculture. This is a secular problem with increasing poverty and the deterritorialization of communities around the world. Ninety percent of Brazilian peasants produce only ten percent of the gross value of agricultural production. Would be the Brazilians peasant areas too poor for development? After a long time producing in a dependent way for agribusiness, some Brazilian peasant movements innovated with the creation of a new food system. based on the principles of food sovereignty, the peasant families began various experiences of agroecological production, family industry, popular markets, and institutional markets and struggles for land. Will be presented examples like banana production in Apodi Plateau, State of Ceará, organic coffee in Minas Gerais and organic rice in the Rio Grande do Sul.


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  • 03:20 p.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 03:40 p.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Technical Session 7: Micro-be-have(Insects, Control, Deseases, Environment, Economic Impact)Chair: Dimas Tadeu Covas, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, (USP)
  • 04:00 p.m.
    Jayme Augusto de Souza-Neto

    Jayme Augusto de Souza-Neto

    School of Agricultural Sciences, São Paulo State University
    From mosquito’s genes to microbes and more: current research and approaches to tackle vector-borne diseases

    Mosquitos are the most abundant and relevant insect vectors of human pathogens across the entire world. Together, the diseases caused by pathogens such as the arboviruses dengue, Zika and chikungunya, and Plasmodium parasites affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide and put at risk more than half of the world population, mainly around the tropics. The insect midgut is the first and most critical site of interaction between mosquito vectors and human pathogens. In this organ, the pathogen must overcome the mosquito’s innate immunity and gut microbiota in order to be successfully transmitted. My group is particularly interested in the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, the main arboviral vector in the world, and Anopheles darlingi, the main malaria vector in South America. We are focusing on understanding the cross-talk between human pathogens and the mosquito’s gut microbiota, and the influence of the vector innate immunity in such process. Unraveling these mechanisms are pivotal for a better understanding of vector-pathogen interactions and for the development of new tools to curb disease transmission.


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  • 04:20 p.m.
    Natacha Kremer

    Natacha Kremer

    UMR5558, Biometry and Evolutionary Biology (LBBE), Lyon 1
  • 04:40 p.m.
    Carlos Eduardo de Almeida

    Carlos Eduardo de Almeida

    Institute of Biology, University of Campinas
    One hundred and ten years of Chagas disease discovery in Brazil: what is to be celebrated and to worry about in the face of demographic, social and environmental changes?

    Chagas disease was discovered in 1909 by Dr. Carlos Chagas. Today, this Neglected Tropical Disease is strongly associated with low socioeconomic status, affecting nearly 8 million people, the majority of which reside in Latin America; and in in Brazil, 4.5 million people are estimated to be infected with this disease. Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and transmitted by various triatomine species. The disease is now reported in other countries (e.g., France, China, EUA, and others) as a result of global human movement. Although vectoral transmission has declined dramatically in Brazil since 1980, acute cases of Chagas disease continue to be recorded. The current infection risk is based on acute case reports, most of which are associated with oral transmissions. In the northeastern region of Brazil, serious outbreaks of this transmission type have surged in the last three years. An important factor of oral transmission is the proximity of humans to infected vectors. It is critical to understand more fully various epidemiological scenarios of this disease (particularly in this region), considering that infection risk may now be changing contemporaneously with socioeconomic factors, human behavior, and the biology of the parasite, vector, and reservoir species. In cooperation with the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France, we are now conducting an integrated approach to survey key factors for sustainable surveillance monitoring. Our approach includes surveying socioeconomic, demographic, entomological, and environmental indicators. Additionally, we will use innovative molecular approaches to identify T. cruzi reservoirs and to understand factors related to vector domiciliation.


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  • 05:00 p.m.
    Claire Valiente Moro

    Claire Valiente Moro

    UMR5557, Laboratoire d’Ecologie Microbienne (LEM), Lyon 1
  • 05:20 p.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 05:40 p.m.
    Keynote Speaker: Amazon and Climate Research

    Keynote Speaker: Amazon and Climate Research

    Speaker: Paulo Artaxo, Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo

    Paulo Eduardo Artaxo Netto earned his PhD in 1985 in atmospheric physics from the University of São Paulo. He has held positions at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (United States), the University of Antwerp (Belgium), Lund University (Sweden), and Harvard University (United States). Dr. Artaxo is a full professor at the Applied Physics Department of the USP Institute of Physics. He works in the field of physics applied to environmental issues, focusing on global climate change, the Amazon environment, the physics of atmospheric aerosols, and urban air pollution.

    Dr. Artaxo is a full member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), and the Academy of Sciences from the São Paulo State. He is the coordinator of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia, and a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), UNEP GEO-6, and other international science institutions.

    In 2004, Dr. Artaxo Netto was recognized by the Brazilian Senate for his scientific research in the Amazon environment. In 2006, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. In 2007, he won the Earth Sciences prize from the World Academy of Sciences. He is one of the most cited Brazilian scientists, and has more than 450 international publications.


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  • 06:20 p.m.
    Concluding Remarks

    Concluding Remarks

  • 06:30 p.m.
    closure
    End of the event in Lyon

ProgrammeParis / November, 25-27th

Monday, November 25th

  • 08:30 a.m.
    registration
    Registration and Tags
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    Opening Session
  • 09:00 a.m.
    hello
    Opening Remarks and Welcome Words

    Opening Remarks and Welcome Words

    Christine Clérici, President, University of Paris
    Marco Antonio Zago, President, São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    Luís Fernando Serra, Brazilian Ambassador to France
  • 09:20 a.m.
    Gilles Guiheux

    Gilles Guiheux

    Vice President Research, Paris Diderot
    Overview of University of Paris
  • 09:35 a.m.
    Carlos Américo Pacheco

    Carlos Américo Pacheco

    FAPESP Executive Director
    Presentation of FAPESP

    Electronic Engineering (ITA - Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, 1979), Master (1988) and PhD (1996) in Economics (UNICAMP) and Pos-doc in Economics (Columbia University, 2005).

    Carlos Pacheco is professor of economics at the UNICAMP.

    Carlos Pacheco was Deputy Minister of Science and Technology (MCT) and President of the Board of Directors of FINEP (1999 at 2002). He was Under Secretary of the Economic Development of the State of São Paulo (2007), President of ITA - Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (2011-2015), and General Director of the Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials - CNPEM (2015-2016).

    He has experience in economics, focusing on regional and urban development and industrial and technological policies.


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  • 10:15 a.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Technical Session 1: Psychology and PsychoanalysisChair: Fernando Menezes, FAPESP
  • 10:35 a.m.
    Todd Lubart

    Todd Lubart

    Paris Descartes University
    Directeur du Laboratoire Adaptations Travail - Individus
  • 10:55 a.m.
    Solange Muglia Wechsler

    Solange Muglia Wechsler

    Pontifical Catholic University of Campinas (PUC-Campinas)>
    Challenges for identifying and developing creativity: the state of art in Brazilian researches

    Creativity can be defined as a multi-dimensional construct involving cognitive processes, personality characteristics, environmental conditions as well as the interaction of these variables. Thus, creativity identification and development can focus on specific dimensions and employ different strategies, depending on the purpose of the study. The assessment of creativity can be verified through valid psychological tests, rating scales, questionnaires and interviews. Brazilian research using these different methodologies indicate that is possible to identify creativity in different domains through instruments with scientific and psychometric qualities. Furthermore, our research has demonstrate that creativity can be discriminated from other cognitive processes and there is no gender difference on the overall scores on creativity tests. On the other hand, research on creativity development has mainly been analyzed in the Brazilian school system, investigating teachers’ ability to identify their students’ creative potential. Our results have indicated that teachers are badly prepared to recognize creative talents and high abilities in their students and tend to prioritize memory in their classrooms rather than stimulating students’ creativity to solve problems. This is a key concern and indicates a main challenge to be addressed by Brazilian research, considering the importance of creativity as one of the most important skill to be enhanced in your children and youth in order to prepare them as leaders for the changes needed in the 21st century.


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  • 11:15 a.m.
    Karinne Gueniche

    Karinne Gueniche

    Paris Descartes University
  • 11:35 a.m.
    Vera Silvia Facciolla Paiva

    Vera Silvia Facciolla Paiva

    Psychology Institute (USP)
  • 11:55 a.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 12:15 p.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
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    Technical Session 2: Earth StudiesChair: Paulo Artaxo, University of São Paulo (USP)
  • 02:00 p.m.
    Magali Ader

    Magali Ader

    Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris
  • 02:20 p.m.
    Janaina Braga do Carmo

    Janaina Braga do Carmo

    Sciences and Technologies for Sustainability Center, Federal University of São Carlos
    Greenhouse gas emissions from sugarcane production in São Paulo state: Lessons learned from the field

    Brazil is the largest producer of sugarcane in the world for the production of ethanol (renewable energy) and sugar. Soil management, use of nitrogen fertilizer and residues from ethanol production such as vinasse, filter cake and post-harvest straw can compromise crop sustainability increasing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Another important issue is the expansion of sugarcane in pasture areas, characterizing a land use change, which may alter the dynamics and balance of GHG emissions in Brazilian agriculture. Our goal is to know the GHG emissions during the conversion of pastures to sugarcane and during conventional cultivation, considering usual management practices, to propose management alternatives to reduce emissions and increase the sustainability of the production system.


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  • 02:40 p.m.
    François Moriconi

    François Moriconi

    CNRS/LIED, Paris Diderot
  • 03:00 p.m.
    Tsai Siu Mui

    Tsai Siu Mui

    Agriculture Nuclear Energy Center, CENA (USP)
    The crucial impact of soil microbiota on mitigation of greenhouse gases in tropical rainforests

    The major cause of global warming is the greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and ozone) which traps the heat energy reflected by the earth’s surface caused by anthropogenic activities. But in soils of tropical rainforest such as the Amazon Forest, biogeochemical processes are actively recycling methane and nitrous oxide, as demonstrated by measuring belowground microbial activities coupled with gas fluxes. The strategy was to monitor simultaneously the flux and isotopic composition of CH4 in the forest soils and the occurrence of active microbes associated to the rhizosphere of the root trees. We also observed reduced emissions of nitrous oxide when natural occurring fauna are freely present in the forest. Thus, a new contribution for the tropical rainforest conservation can be linked to the belowground feedback.

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  • 03:20 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 03:40 p.m.
    break
    Transition Break
  • star
    Technical Session 3: Migration, Urban mobiity and urban social issuesChair: Paula Santoro, Acrhitecture School (USP)
  • 04:00 p.m.
    Camille Schmoll

    Camille Schmoll

    Paris Diderot University
  • 04:20 p.m.
    Ana Lucia Duarte Lanna

    Ana Lucia Duarte Lanna

    School of Architecture and Urbanism, University of São Paulo
    São Paulo: neighborhoods, streets and houses: city scales and urban cultures in the twentieth century

    The objective of my research project is to understand the multiple meanings and experiences of modernity that shaped the city of São Paulo, relating spatial and social processes in progress throughout the twentieth century. Like other contemporary metropolises, São Paulo is a figuration managed by practices and representations, areas of tensions and conflicts that give shape and function to space. Understood as material, social and mental production, the metropolis must be analyzed based on their values, forms of use, materialities and representations elaborated by groups and social actors whose logics and solutions are diverse and result in multiple experiences that are not total reconstitutions. Taking into account fragmentation as an expression of social life and of the city itself, it is important to develop a plurality of urban experiences, to seek to establish links between social practices, symbolic concepts and material constitution of space. Neighborhoods, streets and houses are scales chosen to interweave in diverse temporal, spatial and social dimensions. Operating as a notion of boundaries and connections, the city is taken as a porous and polysemic social space averse to analytical peers of modernity and tradition; rural and urban; public and private; native and foreign.


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  • 04:40 p.m.
    Marie-Caroline Saglio-Yatzimirsky

    Marie-Caroline Saglio-Yatzimirsky

    l’Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (INALCO)
  • 05:00 p.m.
    Miriam Debieux Rosa

    Miriam Debieux Rosa

    Psychology Institute, University of São Paulo
    Immigrants and refugees: reception devices at the interface between desire and politics

    The theme of immigration and refugee resettlement and its cultural, subjective and political developments has become a priority in the world, in which Brazil is no exception. In its political and economic face, we note the intensification of segregation and discrimination and the closing of borders, as well as the subjective vicissitudes of forced immigration and the encounter with other cultures and languages. This presentation addresses three researched aspects of the reception of immigrants and refugees in the city of São Paulo: 1) the contextualization of socio-political suffering in forced immigration; 2) the interfaces between territorial and psychic displacements, politics and desire; and 3) the clinical-political psychoanalytic reception practices developed with these populations. By way of conclusion we bring two findings: 1) the presence of the foreigner highlights the social and political vicissitudes of the host country; 2) The immigrant and the refugee thematize modern man’s challenge of otherness and difference, as well as demonstrate the possibilities of creative reorganization vis-à-vis the profound social transformations of his time.

    Miriam Debieux Rosa: Psychoanalyst, Full Professor, Institute of Psychology, University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil. Coordinator of the Psychoanalysis, Society and Politics Laboratory (PSOPOL) and the Veredas Group: Psychoanalysis and Immigration.


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  • 05:20 p.m.
    Q&A and Discussion

    Q&A and Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 05:40 p.m.
    Keynote Speaker: Amazon and Climate Research

    Keynote Speaker: Amazon and Climate Research

    Chair: Carlos Graeff, UNESP
    Speaker: Paulo Artaxo, Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo

    Paulo Eduardo Artaxo Netto earned his PhD in 1985 in atmospheric physics from the University of São Paulo. He has held positions at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (United States), the University of Antwerp (Belgium), Lund University (Sweden), and Harvard University (United States). Dr. Artaxo is a full professor at the Applied Physics Department of the USP Institute of Physics. He works in the field of physics applied to environmental issues, focusing on global climate change, the Amazon environment, the physics of atmospheric aerosols, and urban air pollution.

    Dr. Artaxo is a full member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), and the Academy of Sciences from the São Paulo State. He is the coordinator of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia, and a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), UNEP GEO-6, and other international science institutions.

    In 2004, Dr. Artaxo Netto was recognized by the Brazilian Senate for his scientific research in the Amazon environment. In 2006, he was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. In 2007, he won the Earth Sciences prize from the World Academy of Sciences. He is one of the most cited Brazilian scientists, and has more than 450 international publications.


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  • 06:20 p.m.
    closure
    End of Day 1

Tuesday, November 26th

  • 08:30 a.m.
    registration
    Registration and Tags
  • 09:00 a.m.
    discussion
    Round Table 2: Funding Agencies - Funding Mechanisms for International collaboration

    Round Table 2: Funding Agencies - Funding Mechanisms for International collaboration

    Nakita Vodjdani, Head of European and International Cooperations (ANR)
    Jean Thèves, The French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)
    Euclides de Mesquita Neto, Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)
    TBC, Universitè of Paris Representation
  • 09:40 a.m.
    break
    Transition Break
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    Technical Session 4: Life SciencesChair: Carlos Gilberto Carlotti Jr., University of São Paulo (USP)
  • 10:00 a.m.
    Rodrigo do Tocantins Calado de Saloma Rodrigues

    Rodrigo do Tocantins Calado de Saloma Rodrigues

    Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo

    Dr. Calado graduated in Medicine from Universidade de São Paulo in 1997 and received his PhD in Medical Sciences [Ribeirão Preto] from Universidade de São Paulo in 2003. Dr. Calado is Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Medical School and his research expertise is in Medicine, focusing on Hematology, acting on the following subjects: aplastic anemia, bone marrow failure, telomere disease and biology, telomerase, and chromosomal instability.


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  • 10:20 a.m.
    Jacques Elion

    Jacques Elion

    Paris Diderot University Medical School
  • 10:40 a.m.
    Erich Vinicius de Paula

    Erich Vinicius de Paula

    Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas
    Activation of hemostasis in inflammatory diseases: Exploring novel mechanisms and searching for new therapeutic targets

    Hemostasis is currently recognized as an integral part of innate immunity, as it is also activated by molecules released during infections and tissue damage, thereby contributing to both pathogen removal and tissue repair. However, the same cellular programs that can be beneficial for the host when activated in a local and controlled fashion can also contribute to secondary tissue damage and disease progression when counter-regulatory checks are lost, due to either the characteristics of the triggering insult (e.g. its magnitude, duration, association with other inflammatory factors), and/or to host-associated factors.

    The main focus of our laboratory is to explore the interplay between inflammation and hemostasis activation in diseases in which both pathways are thought to be involved in tissue damage and/or organ failure such as sickle cell disease and sepsis. While in recent years our efforts have focused on the role of heme as an activator of hemostasis and inflammation in these two conditions, new information about the crosstalk between platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells during inflammation allows the expansion of this list that can also include malaria, hemorrhagic fevers and some hematological malignancies marked by complications that involve hemostasis and endothelial damage. In this presentation we will briefly discuss the evolutionary rationale for the intimate connection between inflammation and hemostasis, as well as an updated view of hemostasis activation, encompassing new concepts such as immunothrombosis/thromboinflammation. We will then present data from past and ongoing research projects in which we have been trying to explore how pathways located in the intersection of hemostasis and innate immunity can contribute to the pathogenesis of these conditions, and discuss projects aimed to explore the therapeutic potential of part of these findings.


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  • 11:00 a.m.
    Caroline Le Van Kim

    Caroline Le Van Kim

    Laboratory of Excellence GR-EX
  • 11:20 a.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 11:40 a.m.
    lunch
    Lunch
  • 01:30 p.m.
    discussion
    Round Table 3: The Universities in the State of São Paulo and the University of Paris: Strategies for International Collaboration

    Round Table 3: The Universities in the State of São Paulo and the University of Paris: Strategies for International Collaboration

    Chair: Raul Machado Neto, FAPESP & Butantan Institute
    Carlos Gilberto Carlotti Jr., Vice President Graduate Studies, University of São Paulo
    Carlos Graeff, Vice-President for Graduate, São Paulo State University
    Munir Skaf, Vice-President for Research, University of Campinas
    Edouard Kaminski, Vice-President for, University of Paris
    TBC, Universitè Paris Representation

    Discussions and Q&A
  • 02:30 p.m.
    break
    Transition Break
  • star
    Technical Session 5: Data Science & Machine Learning for Complex and Dynamical ModelsChair: Alexandre Falcão, Unicamp
  • 02:50 p.m.
    Stéphanie Allassonnière

    Stéphanie Allassonnière

    Paris Descartes University
  • 03:10 p.m.
    Francisco José Fraga da Silva

    Francisco José Fraga da Silva

    Federal University of ABC (UFABC)
    EEG-based feature extraction, selection and classification for Alzheimer’s disease early diagnosis support

    This talk is a summary of my research over the last ten years on the topic of EEG processing and classification to support early diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which is an intermediate state between healthy aging and the dementia caused by AD. It is very important to properly diagnose and follow patients with MCI since they are a group at risk of developing dementia and may or may not evolve to AD. Although AD is progressive and so far an incurable disease, early diagnosis is crucial to introduce medication and treatment that can delay the disease progression and improve the quality of life of MCI and AD patients.


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  • 03:30 p.m.
    Florence Cloppet

    Florence Cloppet

    Paris Descartes University
  • 03:50 p.m.
    Agma Traina

    Agma Traina

    Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science (ICMC), University of São Paulo
    Managing Complex Big Databases to Support Decision Making in Health Systems

    One of the biggest challenges posed to the computer science field is integrating, organizing, and taking advantage of very large volumes of multi-modal data from diversified platforms for boosting decision-making processes. That is, how is it possible to use data from a variety of sources (patient’s exams, monitoring and treatment) to gather information from similar cases and build a better understanding of the case under analysis? Moreover, many times the data are not complete but cannot be discharged, as in the usual approach. In this talk, I will briefly discuss challenges and ongoing researches at the University of Sao Paulo that deal with such challenges in the context of health systems.


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  • 04:10 p.m.
    Q&A / Discussion

    Q&A / Discussion

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 04:30 p.m.
    break
    Transition Break
  • star
    Technical Session 6: Materials, Nano or Bionano MaterialsChair: Carlos Graeff, UNESP
  • 04:50 p.m.
    Antonio Claudio Tedesco

    Antonio Claudio Tedesco

    Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo
    Combination of Photoprocess and Nanotechnology to treat Cancer and Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases

    Antonio Claudio Tedesco, Chemical, concluded the doctorate in Organic Photochemistry in the University of São Paulo in 1992. He accomplished his Pos-Doc among 1993 to 1995, in the Harvard Medical School , Boston, USA in the area of Photobiology and Photomedicine and between 2004 and 2005 developed a sabbatical in the University of Paris (Paris-V), Institute National of La Sante et of La Recherche Medicale: Paris, (Lab Inserm U-532 - Laboratoire of Dermatologie) in the area of Tissue Engineer. Has work as a São Paulo University representative at University of Sorbonne Paris Cité, for International Affairs from 2016- 2017 in Paris. Full Professor at São Paulo University developing research in area o Photodynamic Therapy, Photobiology and wound healing process. It had published more than 240 papers in specialized newspapers with more than 450 works in annals of scientific events. He presented more than 50 conferences, symposia and seminars. He possesses 11 chapters of book published. He possesses 17 technological products, of which 6 are registered, 37 items of technical production. He guided the work of, 50 Undergraduates students ,27 master's degree dissertations and 28 doctorate thesis and 24 Pos-doctorates students, in the areas of Photobiology and Photomedicine Biophysics, Chemistry, Drug Delivery and. Now it guides 6 Pos-doctorate, 3 Doctorates Thesis and 3 Master and 3 IC. Now it participates in 12 research projects, and it coordinates of 5 of these. Since 1999 it Coordinate and it acts close to an applied clinical Projects in Photodynamic Therapy at São Paulo Medical Hospital at Ribeirão Preto, Brasília (UNB-HRAN) and UNIFESP-SP. He acts at the area of Chemistry and Drug Delivery, with emphasis in Photochemistry, Photobiology and Photomedicine. In their professional activities it interacted with 480 collaborators in joint authorships of scientific works. In his CV Lattes the most frequent terms in the work area of the scientific production, technological and artistic-cultural are: Cancer, Photodynamic Therapy, Tissue Engineer, Skin Cancer, Magnetic Carriers, Nanotechnology and Drug Delivery System and 5-Aminolevulinic acid.


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  • 05:10 p.m.
    Amanda Andriola Silva

    Amanda Andriola Silva

    Paris Diderot University
  • 05:30 p.m.
    Leonardo Fernandes Fraceto

    Leonardo Fernandes Fraceto

    Institute of Science and Technology of Sorocaba, São Paulo State University
    Nano-based biopesticides: a new paradigm towards more sustainable agriculture

    Pesticides are widely used to enhance agriculture yields, although the fraction of the pesticides applied in the field that reach the targets is less than 1%. Such indiscriminate use of chemical pesticides is disadvantageous due to the cost implications and increasing human health and environmental concerns. In recent years, the utilization of nanotechnology to create novel formulations has shown great potential for diminishing the indiscriminate use of pesticides and providing environmentally safer alternatives. In this context, nano-based biopesticides can be designed to efficiently delivery sufficient amounts of active ingredients in response to biotic and/or abiotic stressors that act as triggers, employing targeted and controlled release mechanisms. In this talk we will provide the last developments in nanotechnology applied to agriculture with focus in the understanding the mechanisms of action and toxicity and their potential to be used in sustainable agriculture, highlighting the challenges that need to be overcome in order to contribute to crop protection and increase food security.


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  • 05:50 p.m.
    Cathy Etchebest

    Cathy Etchebest

    Paris Diderot University
  • 06:10 p.m.
    Q&A

    Q&A

    Questions and answers from the session
  • 06:30 p.m.
    Concluding Remarks

    Concluding Remarks

  • 06:50 p.m.
    closure
    End of the FAPESP Week France

Wednesday, November 27th

Technical visits - Paris Research institutions (for São Paulo delegation only)

Directions

Auditorium André Malraux
24 Rue Professeur Rollet 20, 69008 Lyon

Amphithéatre Buffon
15 Rue Hélène Brion, 75013 Paris