Professor Fernando Galembeck

Professor Fernando Galembeck

Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6154 – 13084-971 – Campinas – Brazil
Email: fernagal@igm.unicamp.br

 Prof. Fernando Galembeck graduated in chemistry in 1964 and finished his Ph.D. I 1970, both at the University of São Paulo. He worked as a postdoc in the Universities of Colorado (1972-3) and California (Davis, 1974). Currently Professor of Chemistry at the University of Campinas, teaching courses on Colloid and Surface Science, Polymers, Applied Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Microscopy including topics on Nanotechnology. Recent contributions are on polymer surfaces, adhesion, wetting and electrostatic behavior, non-crystalline solids (especially aluminum phosphates), electrostatic adhesion and analytical microscopy (electronic and scanning probe). Many among the former collaborators are making good careers in universities and industry, some abroad. Two Ph.D. theses were awarded national prizes, including the Capes Prize for the best thesis in the year (2005). Authored many licensed patents that originated two products with continuing partnerships and consulting activities with companies, especially on the development of new advanced materials and the respective fabrication processes. Held managing and consulting functions in Unicamp, MCT, CNPq, ABC, SBQ, SBPC e SBMM, Fapesp, and Capes. Participated from the conception, elaboration and implementation of PADCT, that had a large role in improving Brazilian science and especially Brazilian Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. Received the most important prizes in Brazil: Retorta de Ouro (SIQUIRJ), Fritz Feigl (CRQ-4), Simão Mathias e Inovação (SBQ), Inovação (Abiquim), Eloísa Mano (ABPol), Pelúcio Ferreira (Finep) and the prize Álvaro Alberto de Ciência e Tecnologia (CNPq/Wessel), the most important in Brazilian science and technology.

 

Synergy in food, fuels and materials production

Climate change and the increased awareness for the sensitivity of our environment to human action are creating an increased need for new functional materials This requires the mobilization of R&D manpower coupled to the ability for industrial fabrication and marketing of the new products. New materials and the derived products are needed for saving energy and water, creating more desirable life cycles for industrial and agricultural products while decreasing raw materials consumption. Two cases will be discussed in this presentation: materials for decreasing heat trapping, and coupled food-fuel-materials production from agricultural products. Heat trapping in urban settings is due to power dissipation by human activity but also to radiation absorption, creating large requirements for air conditioning, e.g. 1/6 of the electricity generated in the US is used for that purpose. For this reason, materials and devices for reflecting UV-vis-NIR sunlight and for irradiating NIR-IR radiation in the dark or shade are actively sought as well as the best designs to use them. On the other topic, a good example for coupled food-fuel-materials production is sugar cane, that now yields electricity, liquid fuel, many food products beyond sugar and a host of materials for plastic, paper and other industries while storing water in the wet season and releasing it in the dry season.